botanical curiosity & cyanotype

One of the things I love about my art practice is that it encourages me to get outside and find things in nature that I've never seen before. When stumped, I can easily turn to the shapes and patterns I see around me, ready for my contemplation. (c) jocelynmathewes.com

I'm particularly infatuated with plants at the moment. It's a lovely thing, and easy for me to get the kids involved. We can go on a walk together and observe, finding variations in grass species, wildflowers that resemble familiar cultivars, or see a new plant and run home to identify it.

(c) jocelynmathewes.com

And so, my garage has become a bit of a messy storehouse of plant specimens. At first glance, my pile of dried plants looks like a simple pile of yard waste. But not so--they were all intentionally collected pieces of plants that fascinate me. And why let them go? I have a particularly fine dried marigold whose root system sets my heart afire.

 

(c) jocelynmathewes.com

Having grown up in New England, I get to look at Tennessee plants with an outsider's curious eye. Sheer curiosity has opened up the mysteries of plant life around me, and continued to bring me a sense of awe and wonder about the beautiful world we care for.

(c) jocelynmathewes.com